Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2013

icpic eye

ICPIC2013 i-Spy is on!!

Just back from the Opening Ceremony of ICPIC2013 and already I feel I’ve got my “money’s worth” – Pittet, Voss, Seto, Kilpatrick, Kiernan…my ICPIC2013 “i-spy” book is off to a great start, and to be honest, I wasn’t even trying today..!!

There were some great talks this evening, covering topics including SARS and Patient Safety, and the feel in the room was one of anticipation mixed with excitement, I am sure I am not the only one who is looking forward to some great sessions and discussions over the next few days…and the packed programme promises to deliver just that. 

A few of the figures bounced around earlier in the session demonstrated the scope of this event; over 900 delegates, 89 nations represented, 97 oral presentations and 427 posters to compliment…  

I will start my ICPIC2013 experience fully tomorrow, and what better way than with a Hand Hygiene session, chaired by none other than Claire Kilpatrick.  I know.  Amazing.  Hope to Tweet, unlike this evening when I think there may have been a location-based-technical issue…will try a “closer-to-the-edge” strategy tomorrow!!

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Almost ready to go to Geneva to take part in ICPIC 2013, and am very excited; both to have to opportunity to take my research to such an event, and because the programme is absolutely packed with Hand Hygiene related topics (amongst many other IPC issues!).

Abstracts were released last week – and make perfect reading to prime the appetite – my poster is P155…and I’ll add a copy here post-conference….

Hope to blog from Switzerland…and plan to Tweet lots!

 

Read Full Post »

Putting pen to paper, finger to key....

Putting pen to paper, finger to key….

The past month has been all about the writing…although that includes a lot of reading, re-reading, editing, re-writing and, perhaps oddly, drawing too.  However, progress is undoubtedly being made, and I now have some really thick stacks of paper which have a very strong resemblance to ‘chapters’; you don’t even need to look at them in too much of a funny way or anything!

I have been concentrating on writing up my empirical studies which formed the mixed methods case study I am using as the basis for my PhD research.  This case study has been carried out at a large NHS hospital, with great support from Healthcare Professionals participating in and facilitating the research.  Participants from all identified areas of the audit process were included in interviews and observations, to explore the research question:

What is the importance of Domain Knowledge and Human Behaviour for successful Quality Audit Processes and (associated) Technology Development?

Study Summaries

Research Question and 3 studies

Research Question and 3 studies

  • Study 1 addressed the current state of measurement for Hand Hygiene within the case study site, producing a map of the process helping to identify key burdens from the perceptions of those involved in generating and receiving the data. Feedback was highlighted as a key factor requiring further attention, current weaknesses leading to the conclusion from participants that audit output was seen as “meaningless data“.
  • Study 2 investigated the potential of current technologies developed/promoted to aid Hand Hygiene auditing, questioning their ‘Fit-For-Purpose’ using the WHO 5 Moments as benchmark, and discussing examples of such innovations with current Healthcare Professionals.  Whilst some technologies were found to be able to detect Hand Hygiene activity at WHO Moments 1, 4 and 5, no technologies could detect such activity at Moments 2 and 3.  This fact, alongside issues of anonymity, feelings of “Big Brother” and accuracy led to concerns for the Healthcare Professionals as to the usability of technologies – however they were interested in their potential to provide meaningful data about their performance, especially at Moments 1, 4 and 5, which they recognised from their training.
  • Study 3 applied an existing Hand Hygiene behavioural theory – Inherent and Elective Hand Hygiene – to a NHS setting, piloting a new method for both identifying activities classified as “Inherent” or “Elective”, then comparing whether Hand Hygiene in either classification was greater.  This led on from Study 2, where Healthcare Professionals noted that they felt technology to ‘prompt’ Hand Hygiene at activities related to Moments 2 and 3 (e.g. taking a blood sample, removing a urinary catheter) would be unnecessary as they would “always wash their hands if there were bodily fluids involved”.  The study found that, at the setting studied, Hand hygiene was indeed significantly more likely at Inherent activities than Elective activities.

Now I get the very exciting opportunity to take the details of two of these studies (1 and 2) and share them with some of the leading experts within the field of Infection Prevention, as I have been fortunate enough to get a place at ICPIC 2013 in Geneva.  I hope to Tweet as much as possible, and if time allows I will write a quick blog whilst I am out there; if not then I am sure I will have plenty to say about it all once I am back. Even reading (and highlighting!!) the conference programme this afternoon has caused my excitement levels to rise dramatically….

ICPIC

(NB: Will be back to the dissertation writing July 2nd….promise!)

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: